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#Germany Sends 240 Cops to Arrest Nine #ISIS Suspects in #Cologne


Where Did ISIS Come From?

Andy Eckardt and Alexander Smith, for NBC News.

MAINZ, Germany — Nine people accused of supporting ISIS and other extremists were arrested in a series of raids early Wednesday, German officials said. Prosecutors said the suspects included a 58-year old Pakistani national identified only as Mirza Tamoor B., who allegedly supported foreign terror organizations including ISIS and Syrian rebel group Ahrar al Sham. Authorities also alleged that a 31-year-old German citizen referred to as Kais B.O. had helped at least three people to join ISIS. Both were arrested near Cologne.

Around 240 police officers were involved in the dawn raids targeting several properties. The other seven people arrested were suspected of supporting a foreign terror organization and preparing an act that was threatening to the state. “We have been monitoring the group since May 2013,” prosecutor Ulf Willuhn told NBC News. “The accused in our jurisdiction are also suspected of burglary and robbery to help finance foreign terror organizations.” Officials believe at least 430 people from Germany have traveled to Syria to fight — compared to 100 from the U.S.


 

NBC News.

Germany’s New Right: The Unholy Alliance of Neo-#Nazis and Football #Hooligans


The riots in Cologne at the end of October show there is a new danger on Germany's extremist right. Neo-Nazis and football hooligans have teamed up to go after Islamist Salafists. Many are wondering why officials didn't recognize the development sooner.The riots in Cologne at the end of October show there is a new danger on Germany’s extremist right. Neo-Nazis and football hooligans have teamed up to go after Islamist Salafists. Many are wondering why officials didn’t recognize the development sooner.

By SPIEGEL Staff.

Hours after their coup, the rabble rousers were still reveling in their unexpected success. One hooligan going by the nom de guerre “Bo Ne,” happily posted: “We made it into the news around the entire world. Russia, Turkey, Switzerland, Spain, France — first goal achieved!”

It was a view shared by almost everyone in the four closed forums belonging to the group called Hooligans gegen Salafisten (Hooligans against Salafists). With more than 3,000 members, the network is a loose association of neo-Nazis, nationalists and football rowdies — and their posts made it clear that they didn’t think they were being monitored. One regretted not having brought an axe to the demonstration to “destroy all of Islam.” Bo Ne and others, however, were totally satisfied. Germany, he wrote, has now seen “what it means to deceive a people for 70 years.”
And: “Cologne was just the beginning.”

The rally took place on the last weekend in October and saw almost 5,000 demonstrators, right-wing extremists and football hooligans march through Cologne, many of them clearly looking for trouble. Riled up by the right-wing rock band Kategorie C (which sings lyrics like: “Today they are slitting the throats of sheep and cows, tomorrow it may be Christian children”), they filled the Cologne city center with their hate. Tourists and passersby got out of their way.

By the time the march came to an end, 49 police officers had been injured, a police van had been flipped over and plenty of other property had been damaged. Cologne police quickly assembled a special investigative unit made up of 36 officers. State prosecutors say that 32 suspects have now been identified and fully 72 investigations have been opened.

Demonstrators with a banner reading Demonstrators with a banner reading “Hooligans Gegen Salafisten.” With more than 3,000 members, the network is a loose association of neo-Nazis, nationalists and football rowdies.

Unexpected Phenomenon

But questions abound as to how such a thing could have happened. And fear about what comes next is also widespread. Almost as soon as the violence in Cologne had come to an end, dates for further demonstrations elsewhere in Germany began circulating.

The phenomenon is an unexpected one. Thousands of hooligans appear to have left their football clubs of choice behind in favor of uniting against a common enemy: the presumed danger of Islam. In addition, they have joined forces with neo-Nazis and other racists. Nobody, it would seem, thought that such an unholy alliance was possible.

Political reaction was prompt. Lorenz Caffier, the interior minister of the northern German state of Mecklenburg-Western Pomerania, quickly placed the issue on the agenda for the next meeting of state interior ministers. His counterpart from Lower Saxony, Boris Pistorius, demanded the creation of a special police task force. Meanwhile, representatives of football clubs around the country expressed shock and dismay at the violence on display in Cologne.

Yet despite the hurried reactions, the phenomenon is one that has been developing for some time now. Since February of 2012, security officials have had solid evidence that traditionally adversarial hooligan groups were establishing ties and drifting to the right-wing fringe. That month, the Borussenfront — a group of right-wing rowdies that had its apex in the 1980s — invited representatives of other hooligan groups to a “cross-club exchange” in a farmhouse in the Rhineland.

Members of 17 “firms,” as they call themselves in imitation of their British counterparts, came to the gathering from across the country, many of them aging veterans of past battles. They drank plenty of beer and reminisced — a kind of class reunion for thugs.

'The situation was very clearly underestimated,' says André Schulz, head of the police association BDK. Ralf Jäger, interior minister of North Rhine-Westphalia, disagrees, though he does admit that the vast majority of those attending the demonstration were unknown to security officials.‘The situation was very clearly underestimated,’ says André Schulz, head of the police association BDK. Ralf Jäger, interior minister of North Rhine-Westphalia, disagrees, though he does admit that the vast majority of those attending the demonstration were unknown to security officials.

The ‘New Hunters’

One participant recalled that the Borussenfront representatives vented about the left-wing Ultras, complaining about their publicity stunts, such as those seeking to combat racism in Germany’s football stadiums. And in the end, those gathered at the meeting agreed to “cut the Ultras down to size.” Towards the end of the evening, they gave their new group a name: Gnu Honnters, a malapropism of “New Hunters.” In a group photo, four of those present can be seen giving the Hitler salute.

Since then, left-wing Ultra groups in Aachen, Dortmund, Duisburg, Braunschweig, Düsseldorf and elsewhere say they have been threatened, chased down and beaten by hooligans. Some Ultra groups, such as that in Aachen, have pulled back in the face of the new threat.

The hooligans’ success in the battle against the Ultras resulted in a flood of new right-wing members. Meetings began attracting attendees who had previously been active in the “Nationalen Widerstand” (National Resistance) or in now-banned groups such as the “Kameradschaft Aachener Land.”

By the beginning of 2013, according to security officials, the Gnu Honnters boasted 300 members. They went to Kategorie C concerts and took part in football tournaments, such as the “Swastika Cup” in Karlsruhe, where the hooligans met up with neo-Nazis from Duisburg, Dortmund and Baden-Würrtemberg.

Germany’s mainstream football clubs claim that they knew nothing of the development. Many officials believed that hooliganism, once widespread in Germany, had essentially died out — despite the fact that street battles continued to take place outside of stadiums every weekend.

The example of Dortmund shows that, for an extended period, the phenomenon was not taken seriously enough. Indeed, right-wing extremist hooligans had even managed to find jobs within the club’s own security service. It was only a year and a half ago, when Thilo Danielsmeyer, a social worker with the Borussen Fanprojekt, was beaten up during an away match in Donetsk, that the club woke up. Two men had attacked Danielsmeyer in the restroom, yelling “Dortmund will stay right-wing!”

The Borussia Dortmund club responded with anti-racism campaigns, film projects and posters in addition to imposing stadium bans on some right-wing agitators. “That’s how you demonstrate to the right-wing that they are unwanted in football,” says Danielsmeyer. But he was concerned about the fact that those shut out by the club were apparently being recruited by right-wing extremists. In Dortmund, one neo-Nazi invited them to a joint training session at his boxing gym.

Police officers arrest a demonstrator during the march in Cologne. A special police task force has been formed to investigate what went wrong in the city and to find out more about Hogesa.Police officers arrest a demonstrator during the march in Cologne. A special police task force has been formed to investigate what went wrong in the city and to find out more about Hogesa.

Even More Radical

Lawmakers also dragged their feet in the face of the development. After a report about the right-wing infiltration of fan groups appeared on SPIEGEL ONLINE in early 2014, the Left Party in German parliament filed an official enquiry. The response is a document of cluelessness. Knowledge about hooligan networks? “None.” About operations targeting anti-racist fan groups? “None.” About cooperation between hooligans and right-wing extremists? “None.” Officials, however, promised to “attentively follow” further developments.

Meanwhile, the neo-Nazi-hooligan network became even more radical, with some of them waiting for an opportunity to steer the group in a political direction. Developments in Iraq and Syria were exactly what they were looking for, particularly given the proliferation of pro-Islamic State Salafist groups in Germany.

The hooligans adopted their new name — Hooligans gegen Salafisten, or Hogesa — and hoped to receive widespread popular support with their fight against Islamist extremists. One forum member posted in a chat room: “The grannies will love us.”
Early this year, the right-wing hooligan alliance confronted their newfound enemy for the first time, with up to 200 of them showing up at appearances by the notorious Salafist preacher Pierre Vogel in Mönchengladbach and Mannheim. One of the demonstrations was called by the neo-Nazi hooligan Christian Hehl, who was voted into the Mannheim city council in the summer. During this period, rocker gangs — yet another group of men with a predilection for violence — were also part of the Hogesa inner circle.

In short, officials should have known what was coming prior to the orgy of violence seen in Cologne. But they continued to ignore the new right-wing alliance. Just several weeks ago, the police unit responsible for combatting football violence in Germany reported that they knew of only 400 “right-wing motivated” football hooligans in the country. Not long later, the German Interior Ministry commented that “thus far, an alliance between hooligans and right-wing extremists ” cannot be observed. Domestic intelligence officials were convinced that only a handful of right-wingers belonged to Hogesa.

The Salafists have thus far remained quiet in the face of the new threat from the right. But some officials worry that it won't always be so. And if the Salafists begin to retaliate, more violence could be on the way.The Salafists have thus far remained quiet in the face of the new threat from the right. But some officials worry that it won’t always be so. And if the Salafists begin to retaliate, more violence could be on the way.

‘Germany for the Germans, Foreigners Out!’

But at the march in Cologne, groups of demonstrators intoned well-worn neo-Nazi chants, such as “Germany for the Germans, foreigners out!” and “We are the national resistance!” It was clear that only a small spark was needed to trigger a greater conflagration. According to an internal police report, it came at 3:49 p.m. in the form of several people wearing jerseys of the Istanbul football club Galatasaray and showing the right-wing marchers the middle finger while firing off fireworks. The situation escalated immediately and ultimately the mob began assaulting the police.

Some officers were even forced to draw their weapons when confronted by masked rioters armed with knives. The police report leaves no doubt as to the mob’s political views: The participants, it notes, were “predominantly members of the hooligan fan scene as well as members of the right-wing network.”

An internal inquiry has now been started in an effort to determine how officials could have been so misguided in their pre-riot assessments. One investigator believes that the Hogesa network was able to develop in a vacuum that existed between two government agencies. The police are responsible for stadium security and for violence-prone fan groups, but are largely uninterested in their political leanings. Domestic intelligence agents, on the other hand, monitor extremist groups, to which hooligans have not traditionally belonged. “They cleverly took advantage of the niche that we made available,” the investigator said.

Still, the Federal Office for the Protection of the Constitution — as Germany’s domestic intelligence agency is known — had had Hogesa on their radar since the beginning of the year and had an inkling that something was afoot. Prior to the Cologne march, federal intelligence officials warned their state counterparts in Düsseldorf that the hooligan scene was able to mobilize large numbers of people. The number of demonstrators, they said, would likely exceed official expectations of 1,500. They also warned of possible violence.

At the event, some 1,300 police officers found themselves badly outnumbered, confronting 4,800 demonstration participants. “The situation was very clearly underestimated,” says André Schulz, head of the police association BDK. Ralf Jäger, interior minister of North Rhine-Westphalia, disagrees, though he does admit that the vast majority of those attending the demonstration were unknown to security officials. A working group in the state criminal office has now been tasked with determining if Cologne saw a “gigantic flash mob,” as German Interior Minister Thomas de Maizière believes, or if the country is faced with a powerful new right-wing group.

Protesters gesturing toward members of the media in Cologne. The march revealed an unholy alliance between violent football hooligan groups and right-wing extremists.Protesters gesturing toward members of the media in Cologne. The march revealed an unholy alliance between violent football hooligan groups and right-wing extremists.

A Low Profile

The search for those behind Hogesa could be a difficult one. The organizers of the Cologne demonstration immediately went underground and have shunned publicity. A YouTube video was released in which a masked speaker advises those looking for additional information to visit the Hogesa website.

The site was registered under a postal address in the town of Hennef, in North Rhine-Westphalia, and a mobile phone number was also provided. The man who answers the phone says he can help contact those who run the Hogesa site, but also says that interviews must be paid for. Demonstrations, he notes, are expensive: The stage in Cologne alone cost €450.

Dominik Roeseler, deputy state leader for the right-wing populist movement Pro-NRW, likewise sought to keep a low profile following the demonstration. He is the one who registered the demonstration before withdrawing from the steering committee under pressure from Pro-NRW leadership.

Andreas K. was the only one of the organizers of the Cologne demonstration who was willing to speak with us. The owner of a tattoo parlor, Andreas K. is known in the scene as “Kalle Grabowski” and played an important leadership role in Hogesa. He is in his late 40s, wears a heavy gold chain and his arms are covered in tattoos. At previous Hogesa demonstrations in Dortmund and Cologne, he was one of the keynote speakers and led participants in chants of “We don’t want any Salafist pigs!”

But now he says he intends to turn his back on Hogesa. The network has become too large, he complains, and impossible to lead. “I don’t want to be responsible for riots and violence,” he says. “You can’t change anything with violence.” He also claims that he is not a right-wing extremist. “I have never had anything to do with Nazis,” he insists.

By the end of the march, 49 police officers had been injured, a police van had been flipped over and plenty of other property had been damaged. Cologne police quickly assembled a special investigative unit made up of 36 officers. State prosecutors say that 32 suspects have now been identified and fully 72 investigations have been opened.By the end of the march, 49 police officers had been injured, a police van had been flipped over and plenty of other property had been damaged. Cologne police quickly assembled a special investigative unit made up of 36 officers. State prosecutors say that 32 suspects have now been identified and fully 72 investigations have been opened.

Greater Popularity

It is tempting to believe that he isn’t alone with his concerns and that some within Hogesa were surprised by their own violence. But investigators are skeptical. One investigator says he can see no reason why the hooligan-neo-Nazi network would want to stand down: “Cologne was a success for them and it will certainly generate greater popularity for them.”

The right-wing scene seems to be eagerly anticipating the next opportunity to take on the hated “system” under the cloak of anti-Salafism. The Islamophobic blog “Politically Incorrect,” for example, has written enthusiastically about what it is calling “The Miracle of Cologne.” One contributor even seemed to veer into homo-eroticism, writing about the “real men” who took part in the march, the “strapping guys who showed their faces for our German fatherland.”

Die Rechte, a neo-Nazi splinter group that was also present in Cologne, praised Hogesa, saying the group had “impressively established itself.”

The neo-Nazi political party NPD, which suffered painful recent defeats in state elections in Saxony and Thuringia, is now hoping to find new support among hooligans. “The potential is huge,” wrote a senior NPD official in a statement. “The movement has the stuff of a real mass movement.” Another party official, Ronny Zasowk, says: “Now is the time to take advantage politically.”

Conspicuous in their silence, by contrast, has been Hogesa’s declared enemy: the Salafists. But what might happen were they to seek out confrontation with the hooligan right-wingers? A discussion held on the Facebook page of an influential Salafist last week provided a hint. Someone posted, in reference to the demonstrators in Cologne: “I would have cut the throats of each and every one of them.”

By Maik Baumgärtner, Rafael Buschmann, Jörg Diehl, Hubert Gude, Sven Röbel, Christoph Ruf, Jörg Schindler, Fidelius Schmid, David Walden and Wolf Wiedmann-Schmidt


Spiegel Online International.

Father of #Denver teens accused of trying to join #ISIS in Syria says they’re just ‘stupid little girls’


The apartment complex in Aurora, Colo., which police say is the home of one of the three teenage girls who, according to U.S. authorities, were en route to join the Islamic State group in Syria when they were stopped at an airport in Germany.The apartment complex in Aurora, Colo., which police say is the home of one of the three teenage girls who, according to U.S. authorities, were en route to join the Islamic State group in Syria when they were stopped at an airport in Germany. Brennan Linsley / Associated Press.

Sadie Gurman and Ivan Moreno, Associated Press.

DENVER – One of three girls who authorities say tried to join Islamic State militants in Syria was confused about what her role would be if she had actually made it there, the girl’s father said Tuesday.

The FBI says a 16-year-old Somali girl and her friends, 15- and 17-year-old sisters of Somali descent, were headed toward Turkey en route to Syria when authorities stopped them on Oct. 20 at the Frankfurt, Germany airport. They sent them back to Denver, where FBI agents again interviewed them before releasing them to their parents without pressing charges.

“She told me they were going to get there and somebody is going to contact them,” said the father of the 16-year-old, who spoke to The Associated Press on the condition of anonymity because he is concerned for the girls’ safety. “I ask her, ’Who’s that person?’ She actually didn’t have a clear idea about what’s going on. They’re just like, you know, stupid little girls. They just want to do something, and they do it.”

They’re safe now, but the father said he is still troubled by lingering questions about their intentions, who recruited them online and how they were so easily able to board a plane and head overseas.

The FBI is focusing on what contacts they had in Syria, having searched the girls’ computers for clues.

“What they did is unacceptable, and they changed their lives, and they changed our lives,” the father said, adding that he pulled his daughter out of school. She hasn’t had contact with her friends. She told her father she was afraid to talk to him about going to Syria because she knew he would oppose it. “She realizes she made a mistake.”

He said he became concerned on Oct. 17, when his daughter’s high school called to say she had not shown up for classes. He texted her, and she responded that she was just late, but she didn’t return home, and her brother mentioned a disturbing Twitter conversation from her account.

“She asked her friends to pray for her because she and the other two girls … and at that time, I just knew that something really bad was going to happen,” he said. Then, he noticed her passport missing. He called the FBI and his state lawmaker, Rep. Daniel Kagan, for help.

Authorities said the girls had saved their money and stole from their parents to buy their tickets in cash at a Lufthansa counter at Denver International Airport. Their overseas trip raised no red flags. The U.S. government doesn’t have any restrictions on children flying alone, domestically or internationally. Most U.S. airlines allow children 12 and older to fly alone but often with restrictions on international flights.

The girl left behind her laptop, which showed she had been researching whether minors could travel alone and if an entry visa to Turkey was required.

The father wasn’t sure how his daughter, a typical high school girl who likes going to the movies and the mall, was lured to terrorism online. Officials have said one of the girls had planned the voyage and encouraged the others to come along.

The family moved to the U.S. in 2001 and to Colorado three years ago after living in Lincoln, Nebraska.

Less was known about the Somali family, but those close to them said they have been in Colorado for years. Their father, who works as a hotel housekeeper, is from Mogadishu.

Members of southeast Denver’s tight-knit East African community are now concerned other children will follow the girls’ path. The FBI has been investigating whether they had friends or associates with similar intentions.

“This is now an open wound,” said Halimo Hashi, a Somali immigrant who owns an African fashion boutique among a jumble of ethnic markets and restaurants where the girls’ father often visits. “I’m concerned about other kids now falling into that trap because of the attention those girls are getting.”


National Post.

#FBI: Denver girls may have tried to join #jihadis


Sadie Gurman reporting,

DENVER (AP) — Authorities are investigating whether three teenage girls from suburban Denver who may have been trying to join Islamic State militants in Syria have friends or associates with similar intentions.

A U.S. official said the evidence gathered so far made it clear that the girls — two sisters, ages 17 and 15, and their 16-year-old friend — were headed to Syria, though the official said investigators were still trying to determine what sort of contacts they had in that country. The official said investigators would be trying to figure out whether there were “like-minded” friends and acquaintances in the girls’ social circle.

The sisters are of Somali descent, and their friend is of Sudanese descent, The Denver Post reported.

FBI agents stopped the girls at the Frankfurt, Germany, airport over the weekend. They were then sent back to Colorado where they were safe and reunited with their families, FBI spokeswoman Suzie Payne said.

The official said the girls were headed toward Turkey en route to Syria and that investigators were now reviewing evidence, including the girls’ computers.

Another U.S. official called the case “concerning” both to the community and to the country in general.

The officials spoke on the condition of anonymity because they were not authorized to discuss the ongoing investigation by name.

The girls’ fathers reported them missing after they skipped school Friday, taking their passports and, in the sisters’ case, $2,000 in cash.

But the families had no indication of where they might have gone, said Glenn Thompson, bureau chief of the Arapahoe County Sheriff’s Department, whose officers took the missing persons report.

The report contains details of the girls’ movements.

Upon their return, they told deputies they stayed in the Frankfurt airport for an entire day before being detained, questioned and returned to Denver, where they were further questioned by the FBI and sent home.

They told authorities they had gone to Germany for “family” but wouldn’t elaborate.

Suspicion arose when the sisters’ father realized his daughters were gone after saying they were staying home sick. They had taken $2,000 and their passports.

The 16-year-old girl’s father became concerned when he got a call from her high school saying she hadn’t reported to class, according to the police reports.

The families said they had no prior problems with the girls.

Deputies closed the missing persons case Monday after they learned the girls had been returned.

A man who answered the door at the sisters’ home in the Denver suburb of Aurora identified himself as a family member but said he had no comment.

The announcement comes one month after 19-year-old Shannon Conley of Arvada, Colorado, pleaded guilty to charges that she conspired to help militants in Syria.

The U.S. attorney’s office in Denver declined to comment on the latest cases. It’s unclear whether the girls will face charges.

Crimes committed by juveniles are treated as acts of “delinquency” in the federal system and are not handled the same way as crimes committed by adults.

Authorities have not said how they think the girls became interested in helping the Islamic State militants. In Conley’s case, she told agents she wanted to marry a suitor she met online who said he was a Tunisian man fighting with the Islamic State in Syria.

Conley said she wanted to use her American military training with the U.S. Army Explorers to fight a holy war overseas, authorities said. If she could not fight with the extremists, she told agents, she would use her training as a nurse’s aide.

Agents, who had been overtly trying to stop Conley, arrested her in April as she boarded a flight she hoped would ultimately get her to Syria. She could face up to five years in federal prison and a $250,000 fine when she is sentenced in January.

Foreign fighters from dozens of nations are pouring into the Middle East to join the Islamic State group and other terrorist organizations. U.S. officials are putting new energy into trying to understand what radicalizes people far removed from the fight, and into trying to prod countries to do a better job of keeping them from joining up.

(Associated Press writers Eric Tucker in Washington and P. Solomon Banda in Aurora contributed to this report).


The Associated Press.

#Germany arrests 2 suspected Islamic State supporters #IslamicStategroup


The Associated Press.

BERLIN (AP) — German prosecutors say they’ve arrested two men suspected of supporting the Islamic State group and searched the homes of several others.

Federal prosecutors said the two were arrested Saturday in the western city of Aachen. They were identified only as Tunisian citizen Kamel Ben Yahia S. and Russian national Yusup G. because of German privacy rules.

The Tunisian is accused of providing clothing worth over 1,100 euros ($1,400) and 3,400 euros in cash to IS, and smuggling a 17-year-old boy from Germany to Syria to join it. The Russian is accused of participating in the smuggling.

Six others suspected of helping them had their homes searched. One was temporarily detained.

Prosecutors say they searched the homes of seven more people suspected of supporting Ahrar al-Sham, an ultraconservative Syrian rebel group.

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