Tag Archives: Kyiv Post

#Rockets reportedly kill fleeing #civilians in eastern #Ukraine; #Kyiv, #insurgents swap blame


By Christopher J. Miller.In a neighborhood on Donetsk's southeastern edge, Nina Saltanova, 79, sifted through the charred, still-smoldering remains of her home, which was struck by Grad rockets on Aug. 16 Showing journalists the blackened remnants of an apartment adjacent to her house, she said her paralyzed daughter -- who was inside when the missiles struck -- was saved when a local militiaman came to her to rescue. Despite destroying her home and the homes of many others, there were no casualties in this attack in Donetsk. However, the government claims that rebels in Luhansk attacked civilians and killed many. The attack could not be confirmed. © Christopher J. MillerIn a neighborhood on Donetsk’s southeastern edge, Nina Saltanova, 79, sifted through the charred, still-smoldering remains of her home, which was struck by Grad rockets on Aug. 16 Showing journalists the blackened remnants of an apartment adjacent to her house, she said her paralyzed daughter — who was inside when the missiles struck — was saved when a local militiaman came to her to rescue. Despite destroying her home and the homes of many others, there were no casualties in this attack in Donetsk. However, the government claims that rebels in Luhansk attacked civilians and killed many. The attack could not be confirmed. © Christopher J. Miller

DONETSK, Ukraine – Rockets struck and killed many civilians fleeing the besieged eastern Ukrainian city of Luhansk, burning some of them alive inside their cars, the military said on Aug. 18. The exact number of civilians killed is unclear. The government’s report of an attack, which took place in an area of heavy fighting near Luhansk, could not be confirmed immediately.

Anatoly Proshin, a spokesman for the Ukrainian government’s north operational command, blamed the Russian-backed insurgents for opening fire on the convoy of refugees with rockets from a Grad multiple launch missile system near the cities of Khriaschuvate and Novosvitlivka. He said the convoy was flying white flags as it made its way out of town.

“The terrorists committed a bloody crime at 9:40 this morning. Near Luhansk, on the road between Khryashchuvate and Novosvitlivka, the mercenaries used Grad systems and grenade-launchers imported from Russia to shoot at a column of civilians attempting to leave the combat zone,” National Security and Defense Council spokesperson Andriy Lysenko said at a briefing in Kyiv. “Many people died, including women and children. The number of casualties is currently being determined.”

However, rebel leaders say Ukrainian government forces were behind the deadly rocket attack.

Konstantin Knyrik, a rebel spokesperson, dismissed Kyiv’s claims, telling Russia’s Interfax news agency “such claims are pure propaganda.”

A top rebel official of the self-proclaimed Donetsk People’s Republic, Andrey Purgin, also denied that their military forces had attacked the convoy.

“The Ukrainians themselves have bombed the road constantly with planes and Grads. It seems they now killed more civilians like they have been doing for months,” he was quoted as saying.

Meanwhile, fighting raged on in the cities of Zhdanivka, Makiyivka, Khartsyzsk, Debaltsevo and Starobesheve on Aug. 18, said Lysenko, adding that the armed forces of Ukraine continued to push rebels out of Yasynuvata a day after President Petro Poroshenko boasted on Twitter that they had reclaimed the strategically important rail hub.

The Kyiv Post visited the insurgents’ front line of the fight in Yasynuvata on Aug. 17. More than 100 fighters, armed to the teeth with automatic weapons, rocket-propelled grenades and Russian-made sniper rifles said they had been on the receiving end of non-stop artillery fire from Ukrainian forces.

Government troops had rolled tanks into the city and pushed the rebels south beyond a bridge on the edge of town near Makiivka. Dozens regrouped to talk strategy behind a line of trees while others scurried over railroad tracks to their bunkers near the bridge. Around them plumes of dense black smoke billowed from areas where artillery had struck the earth.

Horlivka, Mala Ivanivka, Andrianivka and Alchevsk were completely blocked after intense fighting on Aug. 18, Lysenko added.

Amid the clashes over the past 24 hours, nine Ukrainian servicemen were killed and another 20 wounded, according to the National Security and Defense Council. More than 2,000 people, including civilians and servicemen, have been killed during the conflict since mid-April, according to the United Nations.

In Donetsk, a rebel-controlled stronghold with a pre-war population of around one million residents that has seen some 300,000 flee since the onset of the conflict, fighting damaged two water-filtration plants, forcing running water to be shut off throughout the region, the city council said in a statement.

The neighboring regional capital of Luhansk has been without power and running water for 15 days due to damage incurred by heavy shelling, the city council reported.

Also in Donetsk, the rebel leadership officially introduced the death penalty for “serious crimes,” calling particular attention to treason, espionage, sabotage and attempts on the lives of the rebel leadership.

Death sentences were previously handed down, however, by the former self-declared defense minister of the self-styled people’s republic, Igor Girkin, better known by his nom de guerre Igor Strelkov.

The Kyiv Post recovered documents from his former office in the liberated city of Sloviansk that showed at least three cases in which people were sentenced to death by firing squad for looting.

All around Donetsk on Aug. 18, shelling continued. In a neighborhood on its southeastern edge, Nina Saltanova, 79, sifted through the charred, still-smoldering remains of her home, which was struck by Grad rockets on Aug. 16.

Showing journalists the blackened remnants of an apartment adjacent to her house, she said her paralyzed daughter — who was inside when the missiles struck 00 was saved when a local militiaman carried her to safety. Despite destroying her home and the homes of many others, there were no casualties in the attack.

(Kyiv Post editor Christopher J. Miller can be reached at miller@kyivpost.com andon Twitter at @ChristopherJM).


Kyiv Post Editor’s Note: This article has been produced with support from www.mymedia.org.ua, funded by the Ministry of Foreign Affairs of Denmark and implemented by a joint venture between NIRAS and BBC Media Action, as well as Ukraine Media Project, managed by Internews and funded by the United States Agency for International Development.


Kyiv Post.

#Ukraine: Volunteer Yuriy Biryukov, newly appointed presidential adviser, keeps supporting army


By Olena Goncharova.Yuriy Biryukov (L), a EuroMaidan Revolution activist who is leading a volunteer drive to support Ukraine’s army, was appointed as an adviser to Ukrainian President Petro Poroshenko. © yuri.biriukov/facebookYuriy Biryukov (L), a EuroMaidan Revolution activist who is leading a volunteer drive to support Ukraine’s army, was appointed as an adviser to Ukrainian President Petro Poroshenko. © yuri.biriukov/facebook

Days after his appointment as an adviser to Ukrainian President Petro Poroshenko, Yuriy Biryukov, a EuroMaidan Revolution activist who is leading a volunteer drive to support Ukraine’s army, is in Mykolaiv helping out the local 79th Airmobile Brigade.

His routine hasn’t changed much after Poroshenko signed a decree on Aug. 13 appointing Biryukov, citing his “consistent and efficient volunteer work.” The president said that “there is no more important cause than providing our servicemen with everything necessary to protect their lives.”

As a presidential adviser, Biryukov will focus on coordinating the volunteer groups supporting the army and the government and pointing out on corruption schemes he faced while working as a volunteer with Ukraine’s armed forces.

“Those who stole and who continue to steal should be punished. All corruption cases against certain military officials were passed to court, no one will escape punishment for their crimes. We need to urgently address corruption in the army,” Poroshenko said during a meeting on Aug. 13.

However, the conditions of the service turn out to be №1 duty for Biryukov.

He ensures that he “never stopped and keeps supporting the army,” Biryukov said by the phone from Mykolaiv.

In March, he created the Wings of the Phoenix (Fund for Assistance to the Country) Facebook page that aims to help Ukrainian army. During the nearly six-month Russian war against Ukraine, in which nearly 600 servicemen have been killed and more than 2,210 wounded, Phoenixes helped to raise more than Hr 10 million from the activists all over the world for Ukraine’s army. Most of the donations come from Ukraine, the US and Canada.

Biryukov also keeps track of all money transactions and post it to the group’s Facebook page which adds to the financial transparency.

“I live in the army, I travel to the anti-terrorist zone myself to deliver the equipment to the soldiers, so I know the situation from inside,” Biryukov explains. “I can tell what is going on there, all corruption schemes, so that’s probably the reason why I was appointed – because I’ve seen it all (in the east) and  it is better than to have someone sitting in the office.”

Biryukov along with his team of nearly 30 volunteers risked their lives to deliver hundreds of bulletproof vests, helmets, ballistic eyewear to the anti-terrorist zone in the country’s east. “Phoenix” volunteers also managed to raise money to repair Ukraine’s transport jet AH-26 and to build a headquarters for technical equipment near the city of Mykolaiv city in southern Ukraine.Kyiv Post+ logoKyiv Post+ is a special project covering Russia’s war against Ukraine and the aftermath of the EuroMaidan Revolution.

He also stressed Phoenixes work with Ukraine’s regular army only (which doesn’t include volunteer batallions) and mostly with 79th brigade.

Biryukov, 39, a native of Mykolaiv, has lived in Kyiv for the last 20 years. He used to work for a privaet tourism agency during the EuroMaidan Revolution that toppled former Ukrainian President Viktor Yanukovych on Feb. 22 after starting on Nov. 21. Days later, Biryukov started bringing food and medicine to the activists on Kyiv’s Maidan Nezalezhnosti and volunteered to work in a medical unit.

After his appointment, Biryukov promised “to talk to all those who used to spend budget money,” reads his post on a Facebook page on Aug. 13.

(Kyiv Post staff writer Olena Goncharova can be reached at goncharova@kyivpost.com).


Kyiv Post.

#Ukraine’s founding fathers are over 1,000 years old


By Andrea Chalupa.Children carry portraits of Ukrainian heroes, fighters for the freedom of Ukraine since Kievan Rus times (from the 9th to the 13th centuries) to the present day, to commemorate them during annual Heroes Day in the western Ukrainian city of Lviv on June 1, 2014. AFP PHOTO/ YURIY DYACHYSHYN Children carry portraits of Ukrainian heroes, fighters for the freedom of Ukraine since Kievan Rus times (from the 9th to the 13th centuries) to the present day, to commemorate them during annual Heroes Day in the western Ukrainian city of Lviv on June 1, 2014. AFP PHOTO/ YURIY DYACHYSHYN © AFP.

When someone says, well, didn’t Ukraine belong to this empire or that empire, so therefore why should they have their own country? It’s clear this person’s scope of history is limited. Some people tend to think that history began around the time they were born.

They should stop and consider, for instance, that as countries go, America is practically a teenager: it’s only 238 years old. To put that in perspective, the groundbreaking of the Notre Dame was 851 years ago. The world’s oldest city, Jericho, was established around 9,000 BC.

Civilization is believed to be 44,000 years old, and throughout the millennia, every generation, every tribe had their great beauties and their great wits. They’re all dust now, and we will be too someday, and hopefully a thousand years from now pundits won’t forget us. But they may, especially if they have a political or financial agenda.


Kyiv Post.

#Ukraine: At least 594 soldiers killed in Russia’s war against Ukraine


By Olena Goncharova
Ukraine has lost the lives of at least 594 servicemen since the beginning of the war in the east of the country.Ukraine has lost the lives of at least 594 servicemen since the beginning of the war in the east of the country. © Kyiv Post

Ukraine has lost the lives of at least 594 servicemen since the beginning of the war in the east of the country, according to official count. At least 2,210 servicemen have been wounded by Aug. 13. Civilian death toll already reached 1,367 people by mid-August, according to official data.

During the last two weeks of the anti-terrorist operation Ukrainian army has lost nearly 100 servicemen.

The following is the list of the victims known to be killed since July 29 through Aug. 11:

July 29

Vitaliy Pidlubniy, 30, mechanic from Kyiv Oblast.  Pidlubniy joined the army in early March. He was transporting medicine to his comrades near the Russian border when his APC trapped on mine. Pidlubniy leaves a daughter and a wife.

Kyrylo Andreyenko, 26, commander of the Special Forces unit of Ukrainian Ground Forces. Andreyenko, native Lviv, was killed near Snizhne in battle with Russia-backed insurgents. “He was the officer from the capital letter. Ukraine would be a peaceful country if we had more servicemen like him,” his mother, Valentyna, was quoted as saying. Andreyenko’s unit will be named after him.

Vadym Slobodianyk, 36, gunner from Kyiv Oblast. He was mobilized to Ukrainian army in late March and was killed near Dolzhansky checkpoint.

July 30

Andriy Rodych, 26, senior lieutenant from Lviv. “I have no idea how to explain to my 6-year-old daughter that never will see her father again,” Viktoria Rodych, the wife of the soldier, was quoted as saying.  He was killed in battle with pro-Russian insurgents. Rodych’s relatives still wait for his body to mourn him.

Serhiy Derkach, 40, squadron leader from Pryluky. His car was trapped on mine near Luhansk. “He was always first and never hesitated. The best people always leave first,” his comrade Oleksiy Vysotskiy was quoted as saying. Derkach leaves two daughters and a wife in his native town in Chernihiv Oblast.

Oleksandr Dyachenko, 37, soldier from Zaporizhzya.   Dyachenko was killed by a sniper near Pisky village in Donetsk Oblast.

Vasyl Baloh, 33, captain from Zakarpattya Oblast. He was killed in a shootout near Luhansk. Baloh leaves a wife and  two sons.

Volodymyr Kornev  32, captain of 128th mechanized brigade. Kornev wanted to become a serviceman since his childhood. He was killed in fight near Luhansk.

Serhiy Lysenko , 36, lieutenant-colonel from Ivano Frankivsk Oblast. Lysenko was killed in an ambush near Snizhne village in Donetsk Oblast. His friend recalled he was ready to step up and defend his country when mobilization starts. Lysenko leaves a wife and a son in his native Kolomyya in western Ukraine.

July 31

Serhiy Hulyuk , 32, border guard from Lutsk. He was killed in a fight in Donetsk Oblast. Hulyuk leaves three children in his native town.

Oleksandr Basak, 25, border guard from Kirovohrad Oblast. He was killed in fight with Russian-backed insurgents near Vasylivka village in Donetsk Oblast.

Oleh Parshutin , 39, border guard from Kirovohrad. He was killed while Russia-backed insurgent s opened fire near Vasylivka village in Donetsk Oblast.

Rostyslav Chernomorchenko, 22, border guard from Kirovohrad. He was killed near Vasylivka village in Donetsk Oblast on July 31.

Petro Fedoryaka , 49, soldier from Sumy Oblast. He volunteered to join Ukraine’s army in March and was killed on July 31. Fedoryaka used to be one of Ukraine’s well-known blacksmiths and the founder of Ukrainian blacksmith festival.

Dmytro Akimov, 23, from Dnipropetrovsk Oblast. He used to serve in 25th brigade and was killed while the terrorists opened fire from Grad launchers near Shakhtarsk city in Donetsk Oblast.

Anton Zhukov, soldier from Dnipropetrovsk Oblast. He used to serve in 25th brigade and was killed while the terrorists opened fire from Grad launchers near Shakhtarsk city in Donetsk Oblast.

Vitaliy Matusevych, soldier from Kryviy Rih. He was killed two weeks before his 28th birthday. Matusevych used to work for ArcelorMittal steel company before he was mobilized to Ukrainian army in March 2014.

Dmytro Posokhov 24, soldier from Kharkiv Oblast.

Volodymyr Hordienko, soldier from Dnipropetrovsk Oblast.

Volodymyr Gradyskiy, 43, soldier from Dnipropetrovsk. Gradyskiy was killed when the terrorists opened fire from Grad launchers near Shakhtarsk city in Donetsk Oblast.

Anton Kaminskiy, soldier from Dnipropetrovsk. Kaminskiy was killed while the terrorists opened fire from Grad launchers near Shakhtarsk city in Donetsk Oblast.

Rostyslav Nikitin, 20, soldier from Dnipropetrovsk. Nikitin, Dnipro soccer fan, volunteered to join the army when mobilization starts. He was killed near Shakhtarsk in Donetsk Oblast.

Vitaliy Ivanov, soldier from Dnipropetrovsk Oblast. He served in 25th Dnipropetrovsk brigade and was killed near Shakhtarsk in Donetsk Oblast.

Oleksandr Brahinets served in 25th Dnipropetrovsk brigade and was killed near Shakhtarsk in Donetsk Oblast on July 31.

Oleksandr Sochev, soldier from Dnipropetrovsk Oblast. Sochev was killed near Shakhtarsk in Donetsk Oblast on July 31.

Dmytro Symonenko, 24, soldier from Sumy Oblast. Symonenko was mobilized to the army in March and was served in the country’s east from the first days. He was mortally wounded in fight with Russian-backed insurgent, but didn’t stop firing back, his comrades recalled. He died later on July 31. Symonenko leaves a wife and a son.

Stanislav Kovtun, 28, soldier from Chernihiv Oblast. Kovtun, professional military man, was shot in his neck in fight near Shakhtarsk in Donetsk Oblast. He leaves a wife and 1-year-old child.

Yuriy Chikal, 31, soldier from Chernivtsi Oblast. Chikal used to work as a school teacher in Starobroskivtsi village in Chernivtsi Oblast. He was the only son in his family.

Viktor Babyuk, soldier from Chernivtsi Oblast. Babyuk used to serve in 95th airborne brigade. He leaves two children.

Vasyl Ryabokon, 51, the head of Dokuchaivsky police department in Donetsk Oblast. Ryabokon used to work for police for 18 years. He was shot in his head overnight July 31 when he was on the car with his colleague Mykola Doroshok. Ryabokon leaves a wife and two children.

Mykola Doroshok , 33, policeman from Donetsk Oblast. Unidentified people opened fire on his car at night on July 31 when Doroshok was on his way home after his shift. He leaves a wife and two children.

Roman Abramov, 27, soldier from 30th mechanized brigade from Zhytomyr Oblast. He was killed in a fight near Savur-Mohyla in Donetsk Oblast. He leaves a wife and two sons. His younger son is 1-year-old.

Kostyanyn Dronhovskiy, 30, soldier from Zhytomyr Oblast. He was killed in fight near Savur-Mohyla in Donetsk Oblast. He leaves a wife and 6-year-old daughter.

Aug. 1

Andriy Zadorozhniy, 40, mortar battery commander. He was killed in a fight trying to rescue his comrade. Zadorozhniy leaves a wife and two children.

Serhiy Kushnir, 29, from soldier from Volyn Oblast. His comrades recalled he was cheerful and supportive young man. Kushnir leaves a 2-year-old daughter and wife in his native village.

Mykhailo Kotelnychuk, soldier from Volyn Oblast.

Serhiy Darmofal, soldier from Volyn Oblast.

Ruslan Kalush, 34, soldier from Volyn Oblast.

Aug. 2

Volodymyr Ryzhak, 24, Ukraine’s National Guard member from Cherkasy Oblast. Ryzhak was an active EuroMaidan Revolution supporter. Later he was one of the first to volunteer to the army. Ryzhak gave his life rescuing his younger comrade.

Oleksiy Kudinov, 23, soldier from Kryviy Rih. He used to work for ArcelorMittal steel company as his parents. Kudinov was mobilized to Ukrainian army in March. He leaves his parents in Kryviy Rih.

Evhen Starikov, 32, soldier from Berdychiv. Starikov volunteered to join Shakhtarsk Battalion after Russian annexation of Crimea. His comrades recalled Starikov was reliable servicemen and couldn’t stay away from the duties. He was shot in his head by a sniper. Starikov’s three children lost their father.

Oleksandr Kakalyuk, 38, soldier from Dniprodzershynsk. Kakalyuk’s comrades recalled he was “very helpful.” He rescued wounded servicemen near Shakhtarsk village on Aug. 2 when the sniper killed him. Kakalyuk was mobilized to the army in March. He went back home a week before his death. He leaves a wife and 5-year-old son.

Aug. 3

Andriy Plokhiy, 31, commander from Chernihiv Oblast. Plokhiy leaves a wife and 6-year-old daughter.

Serhiy Nahorniy, 22, trooper from Chernihiv Oblast. He was killed during a shootout near Luhansk.

Andriy Mansurov, 25, trooper from Kharkiv Oblast. Mansurov’s APC tripped on mine near Luhansk.

Stanislav Kish, 19, soldier from Zakarpattya Oblast. He was killed as Russia-backed insurgents opened fire from Grad launchers near Luhansk.

Roman Vlasyuk, 24, soldier from Zhytomyr Oblast. Vlasyuk was killed in fight with Russian-backed insurgents near Luhansk. He leaves his mother and sister.

Serhiy Senchev, soldier from Kirovohrad. He was wounded in fight near Luhansk and died on the way to the hospital. He leaves two children.

Aug. 4

Viktor Medushevskiy, 40, soldier from Zhytomyr Oblast. He used to serve in 30th mechanized brigade. Medushevskiy leaves a wife and 4-year-old daughter.

Serhiy Hrek, 22, Azov Battalion member. Hrek, ethnic Russian, moved to Ukraine three years ago because of political pressure. He was killed in fight near Mariinka village in Donetsk Oblast.

Serhiy Kryvonosov, 36, squadron leader of 79th air cavalry brigade from Mykolaiv. He was killed when the separatists opened fire from Grad launcher near Russian border. “He was a fair servicemen and a good friend. His achievements are enough to name one of the streets in his native Mykolaiv after him,” his friend posted on his Facebook page.

Taras Shpihanevych, 20, soldier from Vinnytsia Oblast. Shpihanevych was injured in fight on July 27th and died in the hospital.

Andriy Panechko, 22, soldier from Lviv Oblast. Panechko’s friends recalled he was cheerful and active young man. He was mobilized in May and was fighting in Ukraine’s east since June 3. He was killed near Luhansk on Aug. 4.

Vadym Kutovoi, 28, soldier from Sumy Oblast. He was killed in fight with terrorists near Horlivka in Donetsk Oblast. He leaves a wife and two children.

Roman Nahlyuk, 28, commander from Khmelnytskiy Oblast. He was killed in fight near Luhansk. He leaves a wife and 6-year-old daughter.

Aug. 5

Vasyl Pashko, 32, from Lviv Oblast. He used to work in Italy when EuroMaidan Revolution started. Then he came back to Ukraine and volunteered to the army. He saved the life of his younger comrade while got a bullet in his head.

Viktor Butryk, 32, soldier from Zhytomyr Oblast. He leaves his parents and 4 sisters in his native Okhotivka in Zhytomyr Oblast.

Oleh Rehotun, 38, soldier from Zhytomyr Oblast. He leaves a wife and three children.

Serhiy Korenivskiy, 33 was killed in fight for liberating Luhansk airport. He leaves a wife and a daughter.

Evhen Tankovskiy, 34, soldier from Kirovohrad Oblast. His relatives recalled he didn’t shy away from the service.

Maksym Lashchenko and Artem Lashchenko, 26, soldiers. Maksym was mobilized to the army while his twin brother, Artem, decided to follow him. Both of the brothers were killed in an ambush near Torez city in Donetsk Oblast. Maksym leaves a wife and 5-year old daughter.

Oleksandr Svynchuk, 28, soldier from Volyn Oblast. Svynchuk used to work as a fireman, but then volunteered to join the army. He got wounded once and received treatment at home while then came back to the warzone. He was killed in fight near Russian border overnight Aug. 5.

Evhen Tankovskiy, 34, soldier of 25th brigade from Dnipropetrovsk. He used to work as a miner and then was mobilized to the army. He was killed near Torez city in Donetsk Oblast on Aug. 5.

Serhiy Rusev, 20, gunman from Odesa Oblast. He was killed in fight in Donetsk Oblast.

Andriy Rudnev, 31, deputy commander from 25th brigade from Dnipropetrovsk. He leaves a wife and 4-year-old daughter.

Artem Karaban, 21, soldier from Volyn Oblast. Karaban was killed in fight near Savyr-Mohyla in Donetsk Oblast. He leaves a wife and a newborn daughter.

Oleksandr Shlyakhtych, 33, soldier from Poltava Oblast. He leaves a wife and a daughter in his native Pyryatyn city in Poltava Oblast.

Mykhailo Kabak, 27, border guard from Odesa Oblast.

Aug. 6

Volodymyr Shestopal, soldier from Kyiv Oblast. Shestopal leaves a wife and three children in his native Fastiv near Kyiv.

Mykola Kolosovskiy, 18, soldier from Odesa Oblast. Kolosovskiy was killed in fight near Debaltseve in Donetsk Oblast.

Serhiy Volnukhin, 28, soldier from 72 mechanized brigade from Zhytomyr. He was killed in fight with Russia-backed insurgents on Aug. 6. Volnukhin leaves a wife and a newborn daughter.

Yuriy Zhabenko, 30, soldier from Brusyliv in Zhytomyr Oblast. His friend, Oleksandr Kravchuk, recalled he saw Zhabenko just before the mobilization starts in March. “He was fair and hardworking man, he used to make his money from the early age, because his family was poor.” His relatives still wait for his body to mourn him. Zhabenko leaves a sister in his native town.

Ivan Syrvatka, 21, driver from Lviv Oblast. He was fighting in ATO zone for four months. He was killed in fight near Krasniy Yar in Luhansk Oblast.

Aug. 7

Viktor Dikhtievsky, 48, border guard from Odesa. He was killed on his birthday by Kremlin-backed insurgent near Amvrosiivka village. Dikhtievsky leaves a wife and a daughter.

Mykola Antypov, 21, border guard from Odesa Oblast. He got a medical major and then he enrolled to Ukrainian army. He served in ATO zone for the summer and was killed near Dovzhansky checkpoint in Donetsk Oblast overnight Aug. 7.

Serhiy Boiko, 18, border guard from Vinnytsia Oblast. He was killed by pro-Russian insurgents near Dovzhansky checkpoint.

Oleksandr Zaets, 20, border guard from Chernivtsi Oblast. He was killed by pro-Russian insurgents near Dovzhansky checkpoint.

Viktor Kumanovskiy, 39, border guard from Cherkasy Oblast. He was killed by pro-Russian insurgents near Dovzhansky checkpoint. Kumanovskiy leaves his family in his native Uman city in Cherkasy Oblast.

Volodymyr Kordabnev, 50, Kryvbas Battalion member from from Dniprodzerzhynsk. He leaves his wife and two children in Dnipropetrovsk Oblast.

Maksym Kochura, 19, Kryvbas Battalion member. Kochura was a student, but decided to enroll to the army. He was the only son in his family.

Maksym Aldoshyn, 23, driver from Mykolaiv. Aldoshyn was in a car with his two comrades when pro-Russian insurgents opened fire near Luhansk. Aldoshyn got wounded, but he didn’t leave the car and rescued his comrades. He died later in the hospital.

Andriy Matvienko, 26, border guard from Kirovohrad. Pro-Russian insurgents opened fire on Matvienko’s car near Lysyche checkpoint in Donetsk Oblast. He died in the hospital later that day.

Aug. 10

Mykola Berezoviy, former head of Vitali Klitschko’s Ukrainian Democratic Alliance for Reform office in Donetsk Oblasts Horlivka and a soldier of Azov Battalion, was lethally wounded by Russian-backed separatists on Aug. 10 in fighting near Ilovaysk in Donetsk Oblast.

Anatoliy Fedchyshyn, Praviy Sector member from Volyn Oblast. He was killed near Ilovaysk in Donetsk Oblast. Fedchyshyn leaves a wife and two daughters.

Oleh Tarasyuk, 45, Praviy Sector member from Rivne. He was killed in fighting near Ilovaysk in Donetsk Oblast. Tarasyuk leaves his family and two grandchildren. His friends recalled he didn’t hesitate to go to Ukraine’s east to defend “his children.”

Vadym Antonov, a soldier of Donbas Battalion from Zhytomyr. He was killed in fighting near Ilovaysk in Donetsk Oblast.

Yuriy Lytvynskiy, 47, a soldier of Donbas Battalion from Kyiv. Lytvynskiy, an active EuroMaidan Revolution supporter, enrolled to the army when mobilization starts and was killed near Ilovaysk in Donetsk Oblast on Aug. 10.

Ivan Hutnyk-Zaluzhniy, 24, Ukraine’s National Guard soldier from Zaporizhzhya. He was killed when the terrorists attack National Guard checkpoints near Amvrosiivka in Donetsk Oblast. “My grandson was killed by Russians who don’t make difference between enemies and brothers,” Hutnyk-Zaluzhniy’s grandfather said during the mourning.

Andriy Dryomin, 27, a soldier of Azov Battalion from Ternopil. Dryomin, UNA-UNSO nationalist party member, was shot near Ilovaysk in Donetsk Oblast on Aug. 10.

Viktor Novitskiy, 36, lieutenant-colonel of Pivnich (North) unit. Novitskiy, professional military man, was killed while he gave medical treatment to his wounded comrade. He leaves a wife and two children in Rivne.

Roman Motychak, 45, Donbas Battalion member from Lviv Oblast. Motychak spend the winter on Kyiv’s Maidan Nezalezhnosti and then volunteered to join the battalion. He was killed near Ilovaysk in Donetsk Oblast. Motychak leaves a wife and two children.

Oleksandr Suslitskiy, 35, soldier from Rivne Oblast. Suslitskiy volunteered to join Horyn Battalion in spring. He leaves a wife and a 13-yer-old daughter in his native Kvasyliv village.

Viktor Polishchuk, 29, senior soldier from Volyn Oblast. He was killed near Luhansk on Aug. 10.

Aug. 11

Pavlo Koval, 25, a soldier of 25th mechanized brigade from Stryi city in western Ukraine. He was killed in fight in Donetsk Oblast.

Ruslan Bilan, 28, soldier from Sumy Oblast. He was killed in an ambush near Stepanivka village in Donetsk Obalst. Bilan leaves a wife and two children in his native Okhtyrka town in Sumy Oblast.

Danylo Kirilov, 23, soldier from Zhytomyr Oblast was killed day before his 24th birthday. He leaves his parent and fiancé in his native Brusyliv town.

Serhiy Maiboroda, 26, soldier from Vinnytsia Oblast. Maiboroda was a peacekeeper in Liberia and lately joined Ukrainian army in the east. He called his parents on Aug. 11 and told them that the shootout began. He was killed later that day. He leaves his wife and 1-year-old daughter.

Serhiy Tyshchenko, policeman from Donetsk Oblast. Tyshchenko was mortally wounded in the fight with pro-Russian insurgents near Horlivka in Donetsk Oblast. He leaves a wife and two children.

Kyiv Post.

MAY THEY REST IN PEACE.

Russia has many ways to wreak havoc in Ukraine


by Nataliya Trach.
Serviceman of the 30th mechanized brigade of the 8th Army Corps at the front in Luhansk Oblast on July 8. © Oleksandr Klymenko/Holos Ukrainy (Voice of Ukraine)Serviceman of the 30th mechanized brigade of the 8th Army Corps at the front in Luhansk Oblast on July 8. © Oleksandr Klymenko/Holos Ukrainy (Voice of Ukraine)

While Russian-backed proxies openly wage war in eastern Ukraine, there are many other fields where Russia implicitly persists to destabilize the situation in order to preserve its influence over Ukraine.

Experts say Kremlin agents are embedded in Ukraine’s security services, the police, army, and parliament. An ongoing Russian trade and information war against Ukraine, as well as the constant threat of terrorist attacks, might contribute to more turmoil in the country.

Apart from that, professional incompetence on the part of certain officials in government and law enforcement bodies stand in the way of marshaling effective resistance to Russia’s aggression, according to analysts.

More destabilization from Russia expected

Russian President Vladimir Putin is trying to maintain Russia’s grasp over the entire post-Soviet territory. And Moscow sees Ukraine’s recent democratic breakthrough following the EuroMaidan Revolution and possible integration with the European Union as a threat to Putin’s hold on power, analysts believe. “All Russian international integration projects like the Russian World or Slavic Unity have no meaning without Ukraine,” says Oleksiy Melnyk, security analyst at the Kyiv-based Razumkov center think tank. “I am afraid that Putin will raise his bets again to keep Ukraine under his control. We can expect even Russia’s direct invasion into Ukraine.”

Mykola Malomuzh, a retired army general and former foreign intelligence chief in 2005-2010, says that according to his information, Russia-backed terrorists plan to shell Russian territory from Ukraine so that Putin could have an excuse to send so-called “peacekeeping troops” into Ukraine. Malomuzh warns that there is a high probability that Russia’s war against Ukraine could spark World War III.

Russian spies, supporters in Ukraine

After former Ukrainian President Viktor Yanukovych’s hasty retreat at the end of February to Russia, the heads of law enforcement agencies were dismissed, yet the middle management of the Ukrainian Security Service, known by its SBU acronym, and law enforcement structures still hold their positions. Some of them are still working for Russia, Malomuzh believes.

He believes dozens of Russian agents in the SBU work in Kyiv and a few operate in the regions. “A scant 0.001 percent of Russian agents among the 45,000 on the SBU staff are enough to betray the state’s interests,” adds the former foreign intelligence chief.

The large number of police officers in Donbas that quickly started cooperating with the separatists make the whole security situation even worse. “Donetsk and Luhansk police are sabotaging commands from the center,” former Deputy Secretary of the National Security and Defense Council Viktoriya Siumar said on April 29.

Military expert Dmytro Tymchuk, who heads the Kyiv-based Center for Military and Political Studies, considers local police units to be a weak link in combating Russian-backed guerillas, estimating that 70 percent of the Donetsk police support the rebels. “A Ukrainian police officer gets $300 a month while a Russian police employee receives $1,200. That’s why the traitors (among Ukrainian police) want to become part of Russia,” Tymchuk wrote on his facebook page on April 14.

Lawmakers from Ukraine’s Communist Party, Party of Regions and the For Peace and Stability factions which many say represent the pro-Kremlin lobby in Ukraine’s parliament are not expected to challenge Russian aggression. “Those lawmakers might block the tribune, block the adoption of European integration laws and they will obviously prevent any law that is disadvantageous to the Kremlin (from being adopted),” political analyst Oleksiy Haran says adding that pro-Russian lawmakers spread Moscow’s propaganda in mass media, which promotes separatism. Continue reading