Tag Archives: Malaysia Airlines

$30 Million #Bounty Offered for Flight #MH17 Attackers as Ukraine Turmoil Continues


By Olivia Crellin.

Malaysia AirlinesA German company is offering a $30 million bounty for the identities of the individuals responsible for downing Malaysian Airlines flight MH17 in eastern Ukraine this summer.

Pro-Russian separatists in Ukraine are suspected of firing surface-to-air missiles at the civilian aircraft, which crashed July 17 while flying from Amsterdam to Kuala Lumpur, killing all 298 people on board. A preliminary report carried out by Dutch investigators said that the crash was the result of structural damage caused by a large number of high-energy objects that struck the Boeing plane from the outside.

Wifka, an independent German fraud investigation company, said that the money — provided by an anonymous client — will not be given away lightly. The reward will only be delivered to someone able to give detailed information on who shot down MH17, who gave the order to shoot down the plane, and who is covering up their tracks, according to Wifka.

“After the terrible assassination or ‘accident,’ all political parties, at home and abroad, said they owed it to the victims, their families and the public to clarify the circumstances of the crash and present evidence for what happened,” the company said in a statement. “None of this has yet been done.”

The list of requirements for the reward also includes information on whether the plane was shot by accident or out of political, economic, or military motivation. The company is also seeking details of the circumstances that led to the incident, the weapon used, and what happened to the people involved.

“The money is securely deposited in Zurich, Switzerland,” Wifka said. “It will be paid there or in a different neutral place of the whistle-blower’s choice.”

The company added that their client has also offered to give the tipster a new identity if necessary.

Concessions to Rebels

Two months exactly from the day of the MH17 crash, Ukraine is still in turmoil. Despite the announcement of a ceasefire 12 days ago, Ukrainian troops have been pushed back on multiple fronts in the last two weeks.

Amnesty offers from President Petro Poroshenko to those who had not committed serious crimes in the east have been largely rejected, and Ukraine’s parliament approved laws Tuesday that give rebels de facto control of parts of the Donetsk and Luhansk regions, a move that has infuriated many protesters and activists.

Vitaly Zhuravsky, an MP who belongs to a party described as pro-Russian, was thrown by angry crowds into a dumpster.

Ukrainian lawmakers did manage to ratify an agreement Tuesday that brings the country closer to joining the European Union. The pact is the same one that former president Viktor Yanukovych backed out of signing last year, leading to the protests that sparked the revolution and ongoing conflict that has so far killed more than 3,000 and displaced 310,000.

“No nation has ever paid such a high price to become Europeans,” Poroshenko said, referring to soldiers killed in the fighting and the early deaths of anti-government protesters.

The agreement would make Ukraine compliant with EU standards in the areas of human rights, security, and arms control. It would also have removed trade barriers, but negotiations with Russia last week led to the postponement of the free-trade aspect of the agreement until 2016.

Poroshenko, a candy magnate-turned-politician who won 54 percent of the vote in the election following Yanukovych’s removal, told an audience of political experts, journalists, and senior European officials gathered in Kiev on September 13 that there could be “no military solution to this conflict.”

Despite the ceasefire, NATO officials said this week that about 1,000 Russian troops remain on Ukrainian soil. Six people were killed by crossfire when rebels attacked Donetsk airport on Sunday.

Seeking More US Aid

A diplomatic solution to the conflict will be undoubtedly be on Poroshenko’s agenda when he arrives Thursday in Washington to address Congress and speak with President Barack Obama. The country’s parliamentary elections are due to be held October 26.

More economic and military aid from the US will also be a topic of discussion, although concerns about corruption, as well as fears about escalating the military conflict with Russia, mean that Poroshenko could leave Washington empty handed.

Paving the way for more government accountability, Ukraine passed a law Tuesday that allows the removal of corrupt officials from their positions. Prime Minister Arseniy Yatseniuk has said that Ukraine will screen roughly 1 million civil servants to root out lingering corruption from the previous regime. The law targets individuals who worked under Yanukovych, as well as former senior members of the Communist Party and KGB.

The US and the International Monetary Fund (IMF) have already pledged a total of $60 million in non-lethal aid, which includes food rations, body armor, and communications equipment, plus $17 billion in bailout money. Ukraine’s Central Bank says that the country’s economy may shrink up to 10 percent this year.


VICE News.

#Poroshenko: ‘Today Ukraine is bleeding for its independence and territorial integrity’


by Kyiv Post.
Editor’s Note: The following is the transcript of Ukrainian President Petro Poroshenko’s speech to the Canadian parliament in Ottawa on Sept. 17. Scroll down for the video
Ukrainian President Petro Poroshenko speaks to supporters of Ukraine during a rally on Parliament Hill in Ottawa during his first official visit to Canada, September 17, 2014.Ukrainian President Petro Poroshenko speaks to supporters of Ukraine during a rally on Parliament Hill in Ottawa during his first official visit to Canada, September 17, 2014. AFP PHOTO/GEOFF ROBINS © AFP

Mr. Prime Minister,

Speaker Kinsella,

Speaker Scheer,

Honorable Members of the Senate and House of Commons,

Honorable Members of the Diplomatic Community,

Distinguished Guests,

Ladies and Gentlemen,

Dear Friends,

It is a deeply felt honor to address this distinguished legislative body.

I must thank you, Prime Minister, for inviting me to come to Canada, Speaker Kinsella and Speaker Scheer – for giving me such outstanding opportunity to address the Canadian Parliament. I see this as a tribute to my country and the Ukrainian people, and an expression of the unique, distinctive partnership that our nations enjoy.

Let me also just once use the third “official language” of Canada – Ukrainian:

Дякую вам за цю честь, дорогі друзі!

To be frank with you – I feel very much at home with you here today in a country that is very close to Ukraine. Not distantly but through our hearts and common ideas.

Indeed, Canada has become home to so many Ukrainians. The descendants of those early Ukrainian settlers who came here more than a century ago. In 1892, a century before Canada was the first to recognize Ukraine’s independence, the first Ukrainian emigrants Ivan Pylypiv and Vasyl Yelynyak arrived. They launched further numerous Ukrainian emigration to the Pacific Coast settling across the woods and prairies of Canada. The Ukrainian community has easily integrated into the Canadian society. They built railways and towns, schools and churches, heroically fought against the Nazi during the World War Second, contributed to the Canadian economy and culture. Later, the sons and daughters of farmers became prominent members of Canadian society – businessmen, scientists, artists, athletes and politicians. One of them, Ramon Hnatyshyn, became the Governor General of Canada.

The list is long and impressive – Premiers of Saskatchewan and Manitoba Roy Romanow and Gary Filmon, senators Raynell Andreychuk and David Tkachuk, artist William Kurylyk, hockey superstars Terry Sawchuk and Wayne Gretzky, and woman-astronaut Doctor Roberta Bondar.

We highly praise great Ukrainian-Canadian sculptor Leo Mol who crafted one of the best Taras Shevchenko monuments in the world, in Washington DC.

If I continue with the list, we will run out of time for this session.

Today the Ukrainian Canadian community is over a million people. It is strong, it is consolidated, it preserves the language of their Homeland, faith and traditions. Ukraine has always felt proud of Ukrainian Canadians and is grateful for their lasting support.

On behalf of the people of Ukraine, I would like to express gratitude to you, brothers and sisters, for your lasting support!

However, it is not only history that bonds us, but also the shared values that make Canada and Ukraine integral parts of a global family of democracies.

Today Ukraine pays a very high price for defending what we believe in – democracy and freedom to choose our own future. For more than two decades we proudly stated that Ukraine gained its independence without shedding a single drop of blood.

Today Ukraine is bleeding for its independence and territorial integrity.

Governor General of Canada Ramon Hnatyshyn in his speech at the Ukrainian Parliament in 1992 stated: “We must not forget people’s suffering which we are witnessing”. That day he spoke of brave Ukrainian and Canadian soldiers who kept the peace across the world in conflict and unrest zones. These words remain so true, as never before.

Today thousands of brave Ukrainian men and women are sacrificing their lives for the right to live the way they chose to, on their land, under the blue and golden colors of the Ukrainian flag, colors which are so dear to many Canadian Ukrainians. In these dark days we feel your support.

It is time we see our friends in our need. And there is no other way to put it – Canada is a friend indeed.

As Commander-in-Chief, as a Ukrainian and a father of a soldier, I thank Canada for each life that is being saved today in the Ukrainian Donbas by a bulletproof vest or a helmet you gave us.

Ukrainian President Petro Poroshenko’s speech to the Canadian parliament on Sept. 17 in Ottawa.

Once again I thank you, Mr. Prime Minister, and your Government, to the Opposition, to Canadian parliamentarians and senators, all Canadians and fellow Ukrainians for standing tall and making your voice heard. For helping financially, with technical assistance and non-lethal military aid, for supporting us at the international fora such the UN or NATO or G-7.

I would like to use this great opportunity to thank all Canadian Parliamentarians for their continuous support of Ukraine. I would like to especially thank for the emergency debates in this House of Commons during critical periods of the Maidan Revolution of Human Dignity. We heard your voice and it was important for us. It is also due to your support that we have won. Thank you for that.

I would like to express gratefulness for the work of the House of Commons Foreign Affairs committee on Ukraine, for the election observation mission which helped ensure that the will of the Ukrainian people was respected. 500 observers were the biggest mission during our elections. It confirmed that the elections were transparent and fair. You helped us establish a new Government in Ukraine. Thank you. We are expecting your mission on Oct. 26 at parliamentary elections in Ukraine for we want to show that they will also be fair and transparent.

Thank you for many visits by Parliamentarians and Ministers, and for your visit to inauguration, Mr. Prime Minister. Canada was one of the first countries to recognize Ukraine’s independence. You also promptly recognized the results of the presidential elections and it was important for us. You are always with us at the most critical junctures.

Also I would like to thank Minister of Foreign Affairs John Baird for his support of Ukraine during Maidan.

I have a long list of sincere gratitude. I really feel your support. I am confident that we will have peace, we will stop the war with the assistance of the whole world. We will do everything for the world to be united. Canada helps us, it shows that it is with Ukraine. Thank you!

Without this support provided by the Government of Canada, by all parliamentarians and by the Ukrainian Canadian community under the leadership of the Ukrainian Canadian Congress, it would be much harder for Ukraine to face the challenges of today.

No other leader or nation, no one, I mean it, with the possible exception of Poland was so straightforward and earnest when sending the signal across to Russians and the rest of the world that fighting a nation which is trying to chart its own path is just conceptually wrong. That arming rebels with advanced antiaircraft systems, providing them with operators, intelligence and flight data is wrong. Those who were equipped, trained and financed by Russia executed a terrorist attack shooting down a civilian MH17 flight killing 298 innocent lives of nationals of Netherlands, Malaysia, Australia and others. One Canadian was killed as well.

I think that war in the east of Ukraine is war against terrorism. It is our common war. I am confident of that.

With your support, with the support of global community we will win this struggle. And we will fulfill the dreams of many Ukrainians in our homeland and across the world – Ukraine will be a strong, independent European nation.

Yesterday was one of the most important days in the history of Ukraine. The Verkhovna Rada ratified the Ukraine-EU Association Agreement. When I was in the Parliament yesterday, it was the last “goodbye” from Ukraine to the Soviet Union.

It was the last Rubicon that we had to cross. We will never return to our awful past. I am confident that our values, our freedom, our democracy, our European future and prospects of participation in various international organizations can be achieved. For Ukrainians passed one of the most difficult tests. We paid the highest price for the desire to be a European country. That’s why we will defend our independence and freedom. We want to become a fully-fledged member of the EU.

This happened simultaneously with the ratification at the European and broadcasted in the two parliaments.

Implementation of the agreement will not only harmonize Ukraine’s trade and customs rules with the EU standards, it will help my country draw closer to democratic norms and market-oriented economy.

At the NATO Wales Summit I’ve declared my country’s desire to move closer with NATO and become the closest non-NATO ally. I hope you will support this.

all Allies strongly condemn Russia’s aggression on Ukraine, illegal annexation of Crimea and stand ready to support territorial integrity and sovereignty of Ukraine within the internationally recognized borders.

I am thankful to Canada; your country was one of the soundest supporters of Ukraine at that summit and committed to provide $1 million to the NATO Trust Fund. It will help Ukraine build up its Command, Control, Communications, and Computers capabilities.

Dear friends, let’s look beyond the crisis and war. Let’s think how we enhance the Special Partnership between Ukraine and Canada.

I am convinced that we need to pay more attention to the bilateral cooperation in such spheres as energy, trade, investments, information and air-space technologies.

In cooperation with Canada we hope to accomplish an ambitious project of consolidating Ukraine’s informational space. By launching the telecommunication satellite built by Canadian company MDA we will be finally able to provide all our regions with reliable and trustworthy information as well as to export telecommunication services.

There should be more projects like this.

I hope that both negotiating teams translated our firm signal, Prime Minister’s and mine, and next time we see each other, we will have Ukraine-Canada Free Trade Agreement ready to sign.

Having said that I can’t help but mentioning one particular program that played significant role in enhancing our people-to-people contacts – I talk about Canada-Ukraine Parliamentary Program (CUPP).

During the years of independence CUPP has hosted over a thousand of students from Ukraine, who were able to work as interns right here at the Canadian Parliament. This program has given birth to some sparkling stars in the Ukrainian social and political universe. Some of the CUPP graduates take high positions in our government; some of them are leaders of the Ukrainian civil society and business community.

I thank the Canadian Parliament and the Ukrainian Diaspora for helping us breed a new generation of Ukrainian leaders.

Mr. Prime Minister,

I remember you mentioning that Canada is probably the most Ukrainian nation outside Ukraine itself. This is true. Let me reciprocate. There are great European nations, which stood at the source of foundation of modern Canada. Canada has friends all over the Globe, and the closest one next to it. However, I doubt that you will find another nation, which could tell, so sincerely, what I am about to tell you. Ukraine is probably the most Canadian nation after Canada itself.

I had this feeling today at the meeting with a lot of Canadians. Thank you for that.

Let me refer to Winston’s Churchill’s words who truly loved your country and visited it seven times from 1900 to 1954. We recall him as brave leader who confronted the Nazi aggression with courage. In summer 1929 he wrote from Canada to his wife: “Darling, I am greatly attracted to this country…I am profoundly touched and I intend to devote my strength to interpreting Canada to our people.”

These words resemble my feelings today. I won’t write these words to my wife since she is here with me today. I will simply tell her this. And again, please let me quote Churchill once again: “I love coming to Canada. God bless your country.”

Thank you! Merci! Дякую! And Glory to Ukraine!


Kyiv Post.

Speculation Runs Rife Following Release of Flight #MH17 Report


By Ivan Nechepurenko.
The final report will be published within a year of the crash, meaning Kiev and the rebels — as well as Russia and the West — likely have months to continue spinning the catastrophe in their respective favorsThe final report will be published within a year of the crash, meaning Kiev and the rebels — as well as Russia and the West — likely have months to continue spinning the catastrophe in their respective favors. Marko Djurica / Reuters.

As pro-Russian separatists and official Kiev cobbled together a fragile cease-fire agreement last week, an international team of investigators put the finishing touches on a preliminary report on the downing of MH17. It did little to elucidate the tragic event, which many anticipated would serve as a game-changer in eastern Ukraine.

“A large number of high-energy objects that penetrated the aircraft from the outside,” caused the Malaysia Airlines passenger jet to break apart high over the battlefields of Donetsk, killing all 298 passengers and crew members inside last July, according to the report.

These findings are consistent with the overarching hypothesis that emerged almost immediately after the crash that the jet was shot down by a missile that detonated before reaching the target and sprayed shrapnel over it.

The report stopped short of placing blame, assigning liability or disclosing evidence that would tip the scales in favor of either side of the ongoing Ukraine conflict.

The investigative team — comprised of representatives from Australia, Malaysia, Ukraine, Russia, Britain, the U.S. and the Netherlands — also made clear that they had not recovered components of the aircraft for forensic examination.

Their conclusions were thus based on photographic evidence and data obtained from flight recorders and air traffic controllers, as well as on personnel, aircraft and meteorological information.

The final report will be published within a year of the crash, meaning Kiev and the rebels — as well as Russia and the West — likely have months to continue spinning the catastrophe in their respective favors.

“Ukraine will say that the report provides evidence of the rebels’ culpability. Russia will say that nothing is clear and that everybody is innocent until proven guilty. All sides will try to use the report to some extent, though not excessively as the whole topic is fading from public interest now,” Alexei Makarkin, deputy director of Russian think-tank the Center for Political Technologies told The Moscow Times.

The Moscow Times interviewed two prominent Moscow-based military analysts, whose diametrically opposed views on the tragic affair attest to the truth in Makarkin’s comment.

Russian ‘Support’

Independent military analyst Pavel Felgenhauer believes that the evidence proffered by the report makes a case for the theory that the rebels downed the plane with technical support from the Russian army.

“Today we know that there were no Ukrainian jets near the airliner, and that it was hit by a surface-to-air missile,” he said in a phone interview.

“Theoretically any kind of anti-aircraft missile could have done this, but in practice only a Buk missile system was in the vicinity,” he said.

The BBC’s Panorama program reported on Monday that a Buk missile launcher was seen near the crash site mere hours before the Malaysian jet was hit. Three so-called “eye witnesses” told the BBC that the system had been operated by Russian nationals. By way of proof, the interviewees claimed the operators had “pure Russian accents.”

Earlier reports also suggested that Buk missile systems were transported in the area at the time of the incident. An unidentified high-ranking rebel told the Associated Press that insurgents were responsible for the crash. According to other reports the plane was downed after being mistaken for a Ukrainian military transport plane.

Moscow has repeatedly denied any involvement in the crash, and also claimed it had evidence that a Su-25 Ukrainian air force jet had been cruising in proximity to the Malaysian plane.

“This investigation will not be able to yield conclusive results, as the investigators must come to Russia to do an inquiry here too. Russia will deny its involvement, so we will only find out the truth once there is a regime change in Moscow,” Felgenhauer concluded.

A man carrying the remains of his infant son, who was killed in the MH17 crash, in Kuala Lumpur on Tuesday.A man carrying the remains of his infant son, who was killed in the MH17 crash, in Kuala Lumpur on Tuesday. Olivia Harris / Reuters.

Lack of Evidence ‘Points to Ukraine’

Offering a perspective that stands in stark contrast to Felgenhauer’s, retired Russian army Colonel Mikhail Khodarenok believes the fact that international investigators have thus far failed to provide conclusive evidence suggests that they have something to hide.

“You can find out what kind of missile was used against a downed plane one day after it was crashed,” the retired colonel told The Moscow Times. During his career, Khodarenok operated S-75 and S-200 air defense systems.

“Each missile type has its own shrapnel imprint. The shrapnel should have been preserved in the elements of the aircraft itself as well as in the bodies of the victims,” he said.

Khodarenok also pointed to the fact that a Buk missile would have hit the aircraft from above, while evidence suggests that it was hit from below. He explained that the missile system operates in such a way where a missile is shot up to great heights, and is designed to hit its target during its descent.

The preliminary report contains images of the fuselage from below the left cockpit window, the cockpit floor, and the cockpit roof, all indicating punctures caused by high-energy objects that penetrated the plane from the outside.

According to Khodarenok, the absence of meaningful clarity in the preliminary report provides the strongest evidence that the jet was not downed by the rebels.

“They do not want to conduct a full and serious investigation, as its results will question the official [Western] version that was declared almost immediately following the crash — that it was all Russia’s doing,” he said.

No Surprises

According to Yevgeny Miasnikov of the Center for Arms Control, Energy and Environmental Studies, the investigation is emblematic of the Ukraine crisis, where splinters of evidence are used to fuel politically motivated speculation.

“What we know is that the airliner was shot down. Everything else lacks substance,” he said in a phone interview.

“The problem is that the public has no access to the evidence,” he said.

(Contact the author at i.nechepurenko@imedia.ru).


The Moscow Times.

Flight #MH17: Wreckage scattered in #Ukraine as inquiry released. #DSB


By PETER LEONARD and MIKE CORDER.
A Pro-Russian rebel looks at pieces of the Malaysia Airlines Flight 17 plane near village of Rozsypne, eastern Ukraine, Tuesday, Sept. 9, 2014.A Pro-Russian rebel looks at pieces of the Malaysia Airlines Flight 17 plane near village of Rozsypne, eastern Ukraine, Tuesday, Sept. 9, 2014. The Dutch team investigating the downing of Malaysia Airlines Flight 17 over Eastern Ukraine says the crash was likely caused by the plane being hit by multiple “high-energy objects from outside the aircraft.” The preliminary report published Tuesday by the Dutch Safety Board stopped short of saying the Boeing 777 was shot down by a surface-to-air missile, but its findings appear to point to that conclusion. (AP Photo/Sergei Grits)

HRABOVE, Ukraine (AP) — A child’s jump rope, its yellow handles blistered and charred. A burned book in Tagalog. Chunks of twisted fuselage. More than seven weeks after being shot from the sky, the wreckage from Malaysia Airlines Flight 17 still lay strewn Tuesday across the fields of eastern Ukraine.

As evidence of the July 17 aviation disaster that killed all 298 people on board remained exposed to the elements, investigators hundreds of miles away in the Netherlands — who have not yet visited the crash site because it is deemed too dangerous — released a preliminary report that left key questions unanswered.

The plane had no mechanical or other technical problem in the seconds before it broke up in the sky after being struck by multiple “high-energy objects from outside the aircraft,” the report said.

A commemorative wreath is laid at the foot of a cross, near the wreckage of Malaysia Airlines Flight 17 plane seen outside the village of Hrabove, eastern Ukraine, Tuesday, Sept. 9, 2014.A commemorative wreath is laid at the foot of a cross, near the wreckage of Malaysia Airlines Flight 17 plane seen outside the village of Hrabove, eastern Ukraine, Tuesday, Sept. 9, 2014. (AP Photo/Sergei Grits)

There were multiple punctures in the cockpit and front section of the fuselage, it said — damage that could be caused by a missile that detonates in front of its target and peppers it with small chunks of metal. However, investigators did not identify the source of the fragments or say who fired them.

Although the report drew no conclusions about responsibility, U.S. State Department spokeswoman Marie Harf said the findings were consistent with “our original assessment, that it was likely shot down by one of these surface-to-air missiles fired from separatist-controlled territory in eastern Ukraine.”

“I’m unaware of other objects or ways that it could be brought down that are consistent with that finding,” Harf said of the report. “It highlights questions for which Russia must still answer.”

A burned book from the Malaysia Airlines Flight 17 plane is seen near village of Hrabove, eastern Ukraine, Tuesday, Sept. 9, 2014. (AP Photo/Sergei Grits)A burned book from the Malaysia Airlines Flight 17 plane is seen near village of Hrabove, eastern Ukraine, Tuesday, Sept. 9, 2014. (AP Photo/Sergei Grits)

The slow pace of the inquiry, its cautious preliminary conclusion and the fact that wreckage and human remains are still lying in Ukraine frustrated and angered victims’ families.

“Well, I don’t know what to say about this,” said Samira Calehr, a Dutch mother who lost two sons, 11-year-old Miguel and 19-year-old Shaka, in the crash.

She said that she wants the people responsible for downing the plane brought to justice “as soon as possible,” pausing for emphasis on every word. “I want to know who killed my children.”

Zenaida Ecal, a 53-year-old resident of Pagbilao in the northeastern Philippines who lost her best friend, Irene Gunawan, expressed frustration that the report discloses only what many already knew — that the Malaysian plane came under fire — but fails to identify the perpetrators.

A burned magazine from the Malaysia Airlines Flight 17 plane is seen near village of Hrabove, eastern Ukraine, Tuesday, Sept. 9, 2014. (AP Photo/Sergei Grits)A burned magazine from the Malaysia Airlines Flight 17 plane is seen near village of Hrabove, eastern Ukraine, Tuesday, Sept. 9, 2014. (AP Photo/Sergei Grits)

“We just want all of the victims to be found, identified and given a proper burial. We want the perpetrators to be identified and punished. As long as these don’t happen, all the families and friends of the victims will continue to suffer,” Ecal said. “It’s taking so long.”

A separate Dutch-led criminal investigation is underway aimed at bringing the perpetrators to justice.

Tjibbe Joustra, chairman of the Dutch Safety Board that is leading the international investigation, acknowledged the preliminary report — mandated by international aviation guidelines — did not shed much new light on the downing of the Boeing 777.

“Perhaps you could say we are a little bit behind, but we are not behind with the truth. We try to make a report that’s for the next of kin — very important — but also for history,” he said.

A stack of preliminary reports by the Dutch Safety Board on the crash of Malaysia Airlines flight MH17 is displayed at the board's headquarters in The Hague, Netherlands, Tuesday, Sept. 9, 2014. (AP Photo/Mike Corder)A stack of preliminary reports by the Dutch Safety Board on the crash of Malaysia Airlines flight MH17 is displayed at the board’s headquarters in The Hague, Netherlands, Tuesday, Sept. 9, 2014. (AP Photo/Mike Corder)

“I understand a lot of people say, ‘Why don’t they work a little quicker?’ But this will take its time,” he added.

Governments whose citizens died on Flight 17 were left in little doubt about what happened.

“The findings are consistent with the government’s statement that MH17 was shot down by a large surface-to-air missile,” Australian Prime Minister Tony Abbott said in a statement.

Christopher Yates, an aviation safety specialist at Yates Consulting, told The Associated Press the report “is extremely consistent with damage from a missile for the simple reason there are penetration marks.

“It must have been moving at very high velocity to create the damage,” he said. “It could only be a missile of the type that would reach the altitude that would have struck the aircraft — potentially a BUK missile.”

Pieces of the Malaysia Airlines Flight 17 plane are seen near village of Hrabove, eastern Ukraine, Tuesday, Sept. 9, 2014. (AP Photo/Sergei Grits)Pieces of the Malaysia Airlines Flight 17 plane are seen near village of Hrabove, eastern Ukraine, Tuesday, Sept. 9, 2014. (AP Photo/Sergei Grits)

The Dutch report came a day after the BBC’s “Panorama” show cited residents who said they saw a BUK M-1 missile being offloaded in a town in eastern Ukraine, near the place seen in photos released by the Ukrainian army that showed a BUK launcher heading east. They said that the crew handling it had Russian accents.

The report added to a growing body of evidence that pro-Russian rebels were involved.

Just three hours before the plane was shot down above rebel-held territory in eastern Ukraine, the AP reported on the passage of a BUK M-1 missile system — a machine the size of a tank bearing four ground-to-air missiles — through the rebel-held town of Snizhne near the crash site.

Dutch Safety Board Chairman Tjibbe Joustra poses at the board's headquarters in The Hague, after publication of its preliminary report into the crash of Malaysia Airlines Flight 17 in The Hague, Netherlands, Tuesday, Sept. 9, 2014. (AP Photo/Mike Corder)Dutch Safety Board Chairman Tjibbe Joustra poses at the board’s headquarters in The Hague, after publication of its preliminary report into the crash of Malaysia Airlines Flight 17 in The Hague, Netherlands, Tuesday, Sept. 9, 2014. (AP Photo/Mike Corder)

A highly placed rebel officer told the AP in an interview after the disaster that the plane was shot down by a mixed team of rebels and Russian military personnel who believed they were targeting a Ukrainian military plane. Intercepted phone conversations between the rebels released by the Ukrainian government support that version of events.

In those tapes, the first rebels to reach the scene can be heard swearing when they see the number of bodies and the insignia of Malaysia Airlines.

Nearly two months later, those insignia and other poignant reminders of the 298 lost lives are still scattered around the crash site.

Samira Calehr said she was disappointed with the pace of progress.

Pieces of the Malaysia Airlines Flight 17 plane are seen near village of Hrabove, eastern Ukraine, Tuesday, Sept. 9, 2014. (AP Photo/Sergei Grits)Pieces of the Malaysia Airlines Flight 17 plane are seen near village of Hrabove, eastern Ukraine, Tuesday, Sept. 9, 2014. (AP Photo/Sergei Grits)

“I think that if this had happened to citizens of the United States, they would make a faster move than here,” she said. “Because I think — I’m so sorry for saying it like this — I think the Dutch government, they are safe players. They don’t want to have an issue.”

Dutch Prime Minister Mark Rutte said the head of a mission to bring back human remains and belongings would travel to Ukraine on Wednesday. But the region is still deemed to unsafe for the Dutch Safety Board staff.

Shelling continued overnight in eastern Ukraine despite a cease-fire, injuring one woman, the city council of Donetsk said.

The council for the rebel-held stronghold said a school and several residential buildings were hit by shelling, imperiling the already shaky cease-fire between pro-Russian rebels and Ukrainian forces.

Local resident Viktor stands on shell crater on the Malaysia Airlines Flight 17 plane crash side, near village of Hrabove, eastern Ukraine, Tuesday, Sept. 9, 2014. (AP Photo/Sergei Grits)Local resident Viktor stands on shell crater on the Malaysia Airlines Flight 17 plane crash side, near village of Hrabove, eastern Ukraine, Tuesday, Sept. 9, 2014. (AP Photo/Sergei Grits)

Col. Andriy Lysenko, spokesman for the Ukrainian National Security and Defense Council, told journalists Tuesday that five servicemen had been killed and 33 wounded since the cease-fire was declared on Friday.

A Malaysia Airlines miniature plane with a text reading A Malaysia Airlines miniature plane with a text reading “RIP MH17” is displayed at a memorial site for the victims of the MH17 air disaster at Schiphol airport in Amsterdam, Netherlands, Tuesday, Sept. 9, 2014. (AP Photo/Peter Dejong)

(Corder reported from The Hague, Netherlands. Associated Press writers Matthew Lee in Washington, Toby Sterling in Almere, Netherlands, and Jim Gomez in Manila contributed to this report).


Associated Press.

#Ukraine: #MH17 crash: Rebels filmed amid wreckage



Dutch experts say Malaysia Airlines flight MH17 broke up in mid-air after being hit by “objects” that “pierced the plane at high velocity” in July.

Investigators relied on cockpit data, air traffic control and images for the new report, as the crash site in eastern Ukraine remains too dangerous to access amid fighting between government troops and rebels.

On Tuesday, footage from the crash site showed rebels roaming amongst the wreckage, as Nomia Iqbal reports.


BBC News.